Abilify sedating effect

The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet.

There is more variability among specific antipsychotic medications than there is between the first- and second-generation antipsychotic classes.

Last year this medication had sales of over ,000,000,000, making it the # 2 medication on the top 10 hit parade of best selling drugs (in dollars).

One of the reasons for such popularity might be the amazing direct-to-consumer advertising campaign for Abilify.

As a clinician, I have noticed certain medications being used more frequently over the past few years. I’ve used Abilify for its approved indications—psychosis, acute mania, maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder, and adjunctive treatment of depression. But I’ve also seen Abilify prescribed for a panoply of off-label indications: “anxiety,” “obsessive-compulsive behavior,” “anger,” “irritability,” and so forth. If you ask patients, they’ll say that—in general—they tolerate Abilify better than other atypical antipsychotics.

It’s not as sedating as Seroquel, it doesn’t cause the same degree of weight gain as Zyprexa, and the risk of contracting uncomfortable movement disorders or elevated prolactin is lower than that of Risperdal.

One lament of many in the mental health profession (psychiatrists and pharmascolds alike) is that we really don’t know enough about how our drugs work.

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